Standard Module B: Close Study of Literature

In this article, we will break down the rubric for Module B: Close Study of Literature to help you ace Standard English!

The Year 12 Module B: Close Study of Literature is a challenging module in the HSC Standard English course. It requires you to gain an informed understanding of your text and the ideas it explores! In this article, we will break down the syllabus to know exactly you need to do to ace Standard English!

English Standard Module B: Close Study of Literature

In this article, we’ll look at:

 

What is HSC English Standard Module B really about?

HSC English Module B: Close Study of Literature requires you to closely read or watch your text. This shouldn’t be a surprise. You should re-read your prescribed text at least 2-3 times throughout your HSC year to build your confidence about the text.

You need to explore:

  • How the text is constructed
  • What ideas and values the text contains
  • Characteristics that make the text unique
  • Context of the text
  • Your response and connection to the text

In short, for Module B you are judging the quality of the text and building your own personal opinion and connection.

You need to ask yourself, how does the text explore ideas in a unique way and how does it make you feel?

In your Module B responses, you will need to show a deep, sophisticated understanding of the complexities of your prescribed text – substantially more than what is required in other Modules. To perform well in your assessments and exams, you must know your text in detail and be able to discuss it with confidence and insight.

 

What does it mean to engage with a text?

Engaging with a text can mean a few different things. Let’s take a look:

  • Consider it’s themes and ideas
  • Explore and discuss what these ideas mean for you
  • Formulate an opinion about the text
guide-english-standard-year-12-module-b-close-study-of-literature-light

 

 

To ace Module B: Close Study of Texts for the HSC, you really need to have a thorough knowledge of the Rubric

To get you ready for the rigours of Module B, we need to take a close look at the Module B rubric.

Being familiar with the Module rubrics is very important. It tells you what you need to do for Standard English.

Okay, let’s see what the Module B rubric states.

In this module, students develop an informed understanding, knowledge and appreciation of a substantial literary text. Through their development of considered personal responses to the text in its entirety, students explore and analyse the particular ideas and characteristics of the text and understand the ways in which these characteristics establish its distinctive qualities.

Students study one text chosen from the list of prescribed texts. They engage in the extensive exploration and interpretation of the text and the ways composers (authors, poets, playwrights, directors, designers and so on) portray people, ideas, settings and situations in texts. By analysing the interplay between the ideas, forms and language within the text, students appreciate how these elements may affect those responding to it. Students produce critical and creative responses to the text, basing their judgements on a detailed knowledge of the text and its language features.

Through reading, viewing or listening, students analyse, assess and comment on the text’s specific language features and form. They express increasingly complex ideas, clearly and cohesively, using appropriate register, structure and modality. They draft, appraise and refine their own texts, applying the conventions of syntax, spelling and grammar appropriately.

Through their analyses and assessment of the text and their own compositions, students further develop their personal and intellectual connections with, and enjoyment of the text, enabling them to express their informed personal interpretation of its significance and meaning.

Source: Module B Course Rubric from NESA website

Develop better analysis with our free Textual Analysis Planner!

 

The English Standard Module B texts are challenging, and that is okay

Year 12 English Standard is about exploring how the human experience is represented in unique ways in texts. They often explore complex, confronting, challenging and even obscure ideas.

It is normal if you don’t understand your Module B text in the first reading or viewing. You might not even like the text. That is okay!

These texts are challenging because they explore challenging social and artistic values of their own context. Their ideas and even their style, structure and form may be different from what you’re used to reading or watching.

However, don’t be discouraged. These struggles are all part of the process and it will be very rewarding once you overcome it!

However, you must be prepared to invest a significant amount of time into the study of your Module B text. There are no quick solutions for English success. Once you’ve engaged with the text a couple of times, you will need to discuss your text with your friends, teachers, and others. You will need to research what others think of the text to understand your own perspective, too.

Doing this will help you develop and clarify your ideas. And, it will help you build a strong and sophisticated opinion about the text.

Your hard work will pay off when you discuss these insights in your Band 6 responses.

 

 

Unpacking the Module B Rubric

To do well in Module B, you must understand the Rubric. Sounds like a lot of work? Don’t worry. We’ve broken the Rubric down into 8 Rubric Statements and explained them in plain English.

Let’s take a look at what NESA wants you to do.

 

Rubric Statement #1

“In this module, students develop an informed understanding, knowledge and appreciation of a substantial literary text. “

Analysis of Rubric Statement #1

This means that you need closely study a text or a series of text by one composer. You will find that Module B texts have important literary significance because of their reputation, ideas and construction.

So, you will need to demonstrate a deep knowledge of your text’s ideas, construction and characteristics that makes it significant. This means that you have to read the text multiple times:

  1. Read/View the first time to familiarise yourself with the text, its plot, its characters, and its setting.
  2. Read/View the second time to start producing notes
  3. Then read/view the thrid time to produce detailed analysis.

To learn more, read our Textual Analysis Guide.

guide-english-standard-year-12-module-b-close-study-of-literature-read

 

 

 

Rubric Statement #2

“Through their development of considered personal responses to the text in its entirety, students explore and analyse the particular ideas and characteristics of the text and understand the ways in which these characteristics establish its distinctive qualities.”

Analysis of Rubric Statement #2

You are not merely studying single techniques and ideas within your text. You are analysing it as a whole.

This means that you have to use your critical thinking skills and see how different elements and characteristics of the text work together as a whole.

Attempt to identify distinctive features of the text… these are features that are unique to the text.

Here are some things you need to identify:

  • Structure – the construction of the text (for example, its perspective)
  • Register – The level of language used (eg. formal or colloquial)
  • Characters
  • Plot
  • Style, genre, and use of language techniques.

 

 

Rubric Statement #3

“Students study one text chosen from the list of prescribed texts. They engage in the extensive exploration and interpretation of the text and the ways composers (authors, poets, playwrights, directors, designers and so on) portray people, ideas, settings and situations in texts.

Analysis of Rubric Statement #3

This means that you need to identify the characteristics listed in the previous rubric point and figure out how the composer uses it in a specific way to represent different people, ideas, settings and situations in your prescribed text.

Everything you see in your text is a thoughtful decision by the composer.

Different uses of technique and form help build different atmospheres, and convey different ideas.

Even if you aren’t purposely identifying them, you will always feel their effects.

Every creative decision – technique or form – affects you in a different way. You might feel scared, or happy. You might hate a character or love them. So, as you break down the text, pay attention to your opinions and feelings about your text.

 

 

Analysis of Rubric Statement #4

“By analysing the interplay between the ideas, forms and language within the text, students appreciate how these elements may affect those responding to it..”

Analysis of Rubric Statement #4

As you continue to read the text multiple times, you will develop different interpretations of the text. This is because every time you re-read a text, discuss it with others, or research new information about the text, you realise something new about the form and language of the text and how it conveys ideas.

As such, Module B is all about identifying how your interpretation and understanding of the text changes over time.

So, it is crucial that you figure out your own opinions, judgement and interpretation of the text before you discuss it or research about it. You need to document your changing judgement and reflect on it, then you can discuss this in your responses.

guide-english-standard-year-12-module-b-close-study-of-literature-opinion

 

 

Rubric Statement #5

“Students produce critical and creative responses to the text, basing their judgements on a detailed knowledge of the text and its language features. They draft, appraise and refine their own texts, applying the conventions of syntax, spelling and grammar appropriately.

Analysis of Rubric Statement #5

This rubric point refers to how you will respond in your assessments. The nature of the new Year 12 syllabus is that there is now less of a focus on traditional persuasive essays. Instead, you may have to respond in a variety of different ways.

You may be asked to produce a multimodal presentation. If you are studying Module B concurrently with Module C, you may be asked to write an imaginative recreation of the text. It is possible that you have an assessment task with multiple parts.

For example, you may be asked to write an imaginative recreation of the text and then produce a multimodal presentation that discusses your choices. In addition, you might be asked to write a reflection that evaluates your presentation against some of your peers’ presentations.

Each of these different tasks would require you to demonstrate different registers, structures, and modalities in your writing and speaking (if you want more information about this, read our post on the new Module C: The Craft of Writing).

 

 

Rubric Statement #6

“Through reading, viewing or listening, students analyse, assess and comment on the text’s specific language features and form. They express increasingly complex ideas, clearly and cohesively, using appropriate register, structure and modality”

Analysis of Rubric Statement #6

This syllabus point refers to the process of critical analysis. If you need help with this, you should read Part 2 of our Beginner’s Guide to Acing HSC English: How to Analyse Your Texts.

In summary, you need to identify the techniques and explore how they convey ideas. Then, you need to make a judgement at its effectiveness in conveying these ideas.

Then, in your responses, you need to respond appropriately according to the tasks you’ve been set.

This means using the right level of language (register), organisation and presentation of ideas (structure), and level of certainty (modality). It’s important that you read your notifications to understand how you should approach the tasks.

For example, a formal essay is going to require a 5 paragraph structure in a formal register using high and medial modality language.

 

 

Rubric Statement #7

“They draft, appraise and refine their own texts, applying the conventions of syntax, spelling and grammar appropriately.”

Analysis of Rubric Statement #7

In your responses, whether it be fiction or non-fiction writing, you will need to engage in the drafting process.

You must draft, write, re-write, edit, and ask for feedback on your creatives and essays. This process will ensure that you produce a refined piece of work that is free from errors.

guide-english-standard-year-12-module-b-close-study-of-literature-draft

 

 

Rubric Statement #8

Through their analyses and assessment of the text and their own compositions, students further develop their personal and intellectual connections with, and enjoyment of the text, enabling them to express their informed personal interpretation of its significance and meaning 

Analysis of Rubric Statement #8

This final point is the aim of Module B. NESA wants you to engage deeply with a text and find a connection with it.

That is, you need to develop a perspective on the text and find it’s significance on yourself and others. You then need to convey this concept to others in your responses

 

 

What texts are studied for HSC English Standard Module B: Close Study of Literature?

Prose fiction:

  • Anderson, MT, Feed (2012)
  • Haddon, Mark, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time (2014)

Poetry (p) or Drama (d):

  • Gray, Robert, Coast Road, (2014) (p)
    • ‘Journey, the North Coast’, ‘Flames and Dangling Wire’, ‘Harbour Dusk’, ‘Byron Bay: Winter’, ‘Description of a Walk’, ‘24 Poems’
  • Noonuccal, Oodgeroo NESA NSW Syllabus website (p)
    • ‘The Past’ ‘China…Woman’, ‘Reed Flute Cave’, ‘Entombed Warriors’, ‘Visit to Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hall’, ‘Sunrise on Huampu River’, ‘A Lake Within a Lake’
  • Rankin, Scott, Namatjira from Namatjira & Ngapartji Ngapartji – Two plays by Scott Rankin (2012) (d)
  • Shakespeare, William, A Midsummer Night’s Dream (2014) (d)

Non-Fiction (nf), Film (f), or Media (m):

  • Funder, Anna, Stasiland (2003) (nf)
  • Weir, Peter, The Truman Show (1998) (f)
  • Nasht, Simon, Frank Hurley: The Man Who Made History (2004) (m)

 

 What does all of this mean for you?

  1. Your ‘informed personal understanding of the text’ is a combination of everything you learned
  2. You must not rush the process of reading and engaging with the text. This will help you build a solid knowledge basis.
  3. Discuss ideas with your friends, teachers and family as you read the text. Your understanding and perspective of the text will grow… which means you are engaging with the text
  4. Buid your study notes by breaking down the text in detail. Determine how different meaning and ideas are conveyed.
  5. Expand your personal opinions and perspectives by researching different scholarly perspectives. How are their ideas influenced by their context? How are your ideas influenced by your context?

A systematic approach to Module B is the key to performing well.

So, What do you need to start doing, now?

Make it a priority to read the text – everything else depends upon this step.

  1. Build study notes early and clarify your ideas as you go.
  2. Discuss your text with others and review your notes and re-read your text in order to feel confident.
  3. Your ideas about the text can only be generated by reading the text yourself.
  4. If you want a guide to this process, read our Beginner’s Guide to Acing HSC English!

Now you have got an understanding of the Module, you should expand your knowledge further.

 

 

Perfect your Module B Essay writing

Gain an in-depth textual understanding, explanations of critical analysis, and essay writing skills and test them with Matrix. Learn more about Matrix Standard English classes now. 

 

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