Part 8: UCAT Practice Paper (Free Download)

In Part 8 of UCAT Guide, we share the 2 hour UCAT Practice Paper written by Matrix UCAT Experts.

Matrix UCAT Practice Paper

The best way to prepare for the UCAT exam is through practice. Download the Matrix UCAT Practice Paper and test your UCAT exam skills!

Download your free UCAT Exam Paper with solutions

download your free UCAT practice paper with 233 questions to help you prepare for UCAT This complete 2 hour UCAT exam paper includes:

✓  Verbal Reasoning

✓  Decision Making

✓  Quantitative Reasoning

✓  Abstract Reasoning

✓  Situational Judgement

✓  233 UCAT Exam-Style Questions

✓  Detailed solutions with clear explanations

Download the free Matrix UCAT Practice Paper.

How to Use the UCAT Practice Paper

Matrix UCAT Practice Paper is in the same format as the actual UCAT exam which comprises of 5 sections. The paper should take you 2 hours to complete.

Note that the real UCAT exam is a 2-hour computer-based test with 233 multiple choice questions.

Before you attempt the UCAT Practice Paper, we recommend that you read the UCAT strategies first outlined in Part 7 of the Beginner’s Guide to UCAT.

To simulate the real UCAT exam, attempt each section with these time limits indicated:

  • Verbal Reasoning Section: 21 minutes
  • Decision Making Section: 31 minutes
  • Quantitative Reasoning Section: 24 minutes
  • Abstract Reasoning Section: 13 minutes
  • Situational Management Section: 26 minutes

Sneak Preview of the UCAT Practice Paper

Below we have some sample from the Practice Paper so you can see what you have in store.

Section 1: Verbal Reasoning

Please read and follow the instructions carefully to avoid any loss of marks:

  1. This section of the exam contains 11 passages to read.
  2. You have 21 minutes to answer 44 questions.
  3. Each passage is associated with 4 questions.
  4. Some questions assess critical reasoning and requiring candidates to read the passage carefully and make inferences or draw conclusions.
  5. You will be required to answers questions or complete a statement based on the passage. The best or most suitable response of four options must be chosen.
  6. For other questions, you must determine if the given statement follows logically. You can choose from True, False or Can’t Tell, i.e.:
    According to the information in the passage, the statement is true.
    According to the information in the passage, the statement is false.
    Can’t Tell: You cannot tell if the statement is true or false based on the passage
PASSAGE

The ‘First Fleet’ was a group of eleven ships that carried between 1000 and 1500 people from Portsmouth, England to Botany Bay, Australia in 1788. The goal of the fleet was to found a penal colony that would become the first English settlement in Australia.

The First Fleet left Portsmouth on the 13th of May, 1787 and arrived in Botany Bay over the period of the 18th to the 20th of January, 1788. The voyage took between 250 to 252 days from departure to arrival, with stops in the Canary Islands, Brazil and South Africa. The chief surgeon of the First Fleet, John White, reported 48 deaths and 28 births over the course of the voyage.

Initially, it was believed that the passengers on the First Fleet were mostly English, but historians have recently uncovered increasing numbers of African, Asian and indigenous passengers on the fleet. These passengers are believed to be a combination of slaves, sailors and free men from North America, China, India, South Africa, Madagascar and Mauritius.

Peter Marsh, the President of the “Descendants of the First Fleeters” claims that there are over a million descendants of the First Fleet in Australia today. However, many people are unaware of their ancestry. The historian, Janet Brooks, claims that those descended from African and Asian passengers are especially unlikely to know their ancestry, as their details are more likely to have been “left out or buried” in the official documents.

QUESTION

Australia Day, the 26th of January, commemorates the anniversary of the First Fleet’s arrival in Botany Bay.

True
False
Can’t Tell

 

Section 2: Decision Making

Please read and follow the instructions carefully to avoid any loss of marks:

  1. In this section of the exam, you will be presented with questions that may refer to text, charts or graphs.
  2. Additional information may be presented within the question itself. All questions are standalone and do not share data.
  3. Some questions will have four answer options but only one correct answer; others will require you to respond to five statements by placing a ‘yes’ or ‘no’ answer next to each statement.
  4. You have 31 minutes to answer 29 questions.
QUESTION

Of the dogs present at the annual dog fair this year, none were female that were of the Maltese breed.

Place ‘Yes’ if the conclusion does follow. Place ‘No’ if the conclusion does not follow.

1. Only male dogs were present at the annual dog fair.
2. Very few female dogs were present at the annual dog fair.
3. No dog at the annual dog fair who is of the Maltese breed was female.
4. The dogs at the annual dog fair that are of the Maltese breed were male.
5. All the male dogs at the annual dog fair were of the Maltese breed.

 

Section 3: Quantitative Reasoning

Please read and follow the instructions carefully to avoid any loss of marks:

  1. In this section of the exam, you will be presented with questions that most often refer to charts and graphs containing data.
  2. Additional information may be presented within the question itself.
  3. Most questions will be shown as sets of four questions each connected to the same data.
  4. There are some standalone questions which do not share data.
  5. Each question has five answer options. Your task is to choose the best option.
  6. You have 24 minutes to answer 36 questions.
PASSAGE

UCAT-Quantitative-Reasoning-Sample-Question-From-UCAT-Practice-Paper

QUESTION

In the tax year 2018-2019, Ashley’s base salary was $42,000. How much income tax was deducted from her salary during that year?

A. $4,522
B. $8,655
C. $5,172
D. $5,235
E. $5,197

 

Section 4: Abstract Reasoning

You will have 13 minutes to answer 55 questions.

There are 4 different question types in this section of the exam:

  • For type 1, you will be presented with two sets of shapes labelled “Set A” and “Set B”. You will be given a test shape and asked to decide whether the test shape belongs to Set A, Set B, or Neither.
  • For type 2, you will be presented with a series of shapes. You will be asked to select the next shape in the series.
  • For type 3, you will be presented with a statement, involving a group of shapes. You will be asked to determine which shape completes the statement.
  • For type 4, you will be presented with two sets of shapes labelled “Set A” and “Set B”. You will be asked to select which of the four response options belongs to Set A or Set B.
DATA SETS

 

QUESTION

 

 

Section 5: Situational Judgement

Please read and follow the instructions carefully to avoid any loss of marks:

  1. In this section of the exam, you will be presented with questions that may refer to text, charts or graphs.
  2. Additional information may be presented within the question itself. All questions are standalone and do not share data.
  3. Some questions will have four answer options but only one correct answer; others will require you to respond to five statements by placing a ‘yes’ or ‘no’ answer next to each statement.
  4. You have 31 minutes to answer 29 questions.
SCENARIO

Nick and Chris are medical students examining a patient, Michael, complaining of ankle pain. Nick examines the ankle and concludes that Michael’s ankle is not injured. Chris performs a more thorough examination and believes that the bone in Michael’s foot underneath the ankle may be broken. Michael makes a comment that the two examinations were different.

QUESTION

How appropriate are each of the following responses by Chris in this situation?

With Michael’s permission, explain to Nick where he believes the pain is originating.

  1. A very appropriate thing to do
  2. Appropriate, but not ideal
  3. Inappropriate, but not awful
  4. A very inappropriate thing to do

 

Need help? We’ve got the UCAT covered.

 

 

© Matrix Education and www.matrix.edu.au, 2018. Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this site’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Matrix Education and www.matrix.edu.au with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

 

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